National Concussion League (NCL): The Future of the NFL

On Superbowl Sunday morning, as I was drinking my coffee, Chris Matthews discussed the topic of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) with regard to the NFL.

One commentator said knowing what he knows despite his love for the game, he will never let his son play football. 

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Players nowadays are faster stronger and hitting harder than ever before. The stronger and faster they are the harder the hits will be. Why? The stronger and faster the fullback or running back are, the stronger and faster the defensive linemen and backs will need to be to be able to take them down. And we know how the NFL draft works. 

No safety device will ever protect the brain from Traumatic Axonal Injury (TAI) or Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI) or lesions resulting from coup contra coup forces. The mechanism of Traumatic Axonal Injury (TAI) or Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI) or lesions resulting from coup contra coup forces do not require even trauma or actual physical force to the head. It is the sudden movement or sudden acceleration and deceleration of the brain when the head suddenly jerks backwards and forwards or sideways that causes Traumatic Axonal Injury (TAI) or Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI) or lesions resulting from coup contra coup forces.

Those advocates of more protective helmets to guard against Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) either don't understand or purposefully ignore the physiology of the brain which floats encased inside a hard rigid bony skull and will always move when the body is subjected to forces no matter the type of helmet you wear. I'm sure the helmet industry will profit quite a bit before admitting to the aforementioned reality of how Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can occur.

And flag football will never be as exciting and gruesome to watch which is why we love to watch hard hits.

I myself have to admit that I love seeing a hard hit as anyone else so a softer hitting NFL will be quite boring.

In addition, due to the consistent discovery of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE- a form of Traumatic Brain Injury that is caused by repeated concussions which basically kills parts of the brain) in the brain tissue of almost every former NFL and other professional athlete retirees who have committed suicide, the NFL has finally admitted that it has a problem with concussions. Guess what Mr. Goodell, concussions is what draws people to watch the NFL. We love hard hits that often causes concussions. So what will the NFL do to reduce concussions. In my opinion, there is nothing the NFL can do except to keep the players from playing again after suffering a concussion. Because concussion also known as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)  is the name of the game.

The culture of football is about hitting hard. This culture of hitting hard starts with youth leagues which then is perpetuated to high school. And if a football is talented enough and "lucky" enough to get drafted by the NCAA scouts, then hitting hard continues throughout college. Finally, the pinnacle of any football player's dream and fantasy: being drafted to the NFL- where concussions aka Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) are more likely to occur since this is where the hitting is hardest. 

Do we think that these players will ever want to tell the coach or that the coach will ever want to hear that the player has suffered a concussion aka Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and therefore should sit out for the few weeks? Really sitting out for a few weeks after a concussion aka Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is not going to to do anything to prevent Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) or other "less" dramatic Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) symptoms such as memory loss, depression, anxiety, confusion, and sleep disorder. Those who were lucky enough to have suffered the "lesser" symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) from concussions and stopped playing the game have not committed suicide but live with cognitive deficits and psychological/psychiatric issues. Football- what a great game we should introduce little boys to. What a great game we should get so excited about.

And here's the kicker: most of the concussions aka Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) suffered by football players are classified as mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI). 

So I would hate to be the dad who is asked by his cognitively impaired teenage why he allowed him to play pee wee football despite knowing what he should have known about concussions and the way of football.

NGUYEN LEFTT P.C. – Traumatic Brain Injury Attorneys / Lawyers
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